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Varieties of English

  1. A) Explain the words given in italics. Make up sentences of your own. Use English-English dictionaries to help you.
  2. A) READ THE TEXT AND FIND THE ENGLISH EQUIVALENTS FOR THE FOLLOWING WORDS
  3. A. AN ENGLISHMAN'S DAY
  4. A. Read the text, give the English equivalents for the words in brackets, and single out the main items of the income statement.
  5. About English language
  6. About English Law
  7. Act as an interpreter. Translate the description of N-type and P-type- semiconductors given by your group mates from English into Russian.

As English has spread, so has it changed, and there are now several recognized varieties of English. While the English spoken in Britain's former "white" colonies - the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand - is still very similar to British English, and differs from it only in matters of vocabulary and phraseology, the English spoken in the West Indies and in countries such as India where English is the second language and can be very different in syntax and grammar.

American English, for example, has been influenced by American Indian languages, by Spanish, and by the languages of all the ethnic groups that have immigrated to the US over the years. But it still understood without difficulty by speakers of British English. Indeed, many "Americanisms" - words or phrases which originated in America - have been assimilated back into British English; words such as skunk (American Indian), canyon, banana, potato (Spanish) or expressions such as to take a back seat, to strike oil, to cave in.

Other words - automobile, cookie, crazy, highway, mail, movie, truck - still have an American flavour but are increasingly used by speakers of British English. A few words - remain decidedly American, as do some forms of spelling (color - colour, theatre - theatre, tire - tyre).

Australian English also has its own "home-grown" words, some of which have made their way into international English (boomerang, budgerigar), though others (cobber = friend, sheila = girl, tucker =food, dinkum = good) remain distinctively Australian.

 



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