Categories of torts

  1. IV. Sort these foods into the categories.
  2. Laws and categories of sociology
  1. Negligence is a tort which depends on the existence of a breach of duty of care owed by one person to another.
  2. A statutory tort is like any other, in that it imposes duties on private or public parties, however they are created by the legislature, not the courts.
  3. Nuisance. Legally, the term "nuisance" is traditionally used in three ways: (1) to describe an activity or condition that is harmful or annoying to others (e.g., indecent conduct, a rubbish heap or a smoking chimney); (2) to describe the harm caused by the before-mentioned activity or condition (e.g., loud noises or objectionable odors); and (3) to describe a legal liability that arises from the combination of the two. The law of nuisance was created to stop such bothersome activities or conduct when they unreasonably interfered either with the rights of other private landowners (i.e.,private nuisance) or with the rights of the general public (i.e., public nuisance).
  4. Defamation is tarnishing the reputation of someone; it is in two parts, slander and libel. Slander is spoken defamation and libel is printed and broadcast defamation, both share the same features. Defaming someone entails making a factual assertion for which evidence does not exist.
  5. Intentional torts are any intentional acts that are reasonably foreseeable to cause harm to an individual, and that do so. Intentional torts have several subcategories, including tort(s) against the person, including assault, battery, false imprisonment, intentional infliction of emotional distress, and fraud. Property torts involve any intentional interference with the property rights of the claimant. Those commonly recognized include trespass to land, trespass to chattels, and conversion.
  6. Economic torts protect people from interference with their trade or business. The area includes the doctrine of restraint of trade and has largely been submergedin the twentieth century by statutory interventions on collective labour law and modern antitrust or competition law. The "absence of any unifying principle drawing together the different heads of economic tort liability has often been remarked upon."
  7. Competition law. Modern competition law is an important method for regulating the conduct of businesses in a market economy. A major subsetof statutory torts, it is also called 'anti-trust' law, especially in the United States.


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